Tag housing disrepair lambeth

Leaking roof in rented accommodation

Leaking roof in rented accommodation

Leaking roof in rented accommodation

Leaking roof in rented accommodation Are you enduring the frustration of a leaking roof in your rented accommodation? Don’t suffer in silence! As a tenant in England and Wales, you have rights that protect you from living in substandard conditions. In this guide, we’ll explore why making a housing disrepair claim for a leaking roof is not only your right but also a crucial step towards ensuring a safe and habitable living environment.

  1. Understanding Your Rights: As a tenant, you deserve to live in a property that meets certain standards of repair and maintenance. A leaking roof is not only an inconvenience but also a serious issue that can lead to property damage and health hazards. Under housing law in England and Wales, landlords are obligated to address disrepair issues promptly, including problems with the roof.
  2. Identifying the Problem: A leaking roof can manifest in various ways, from water stains on ceilings and walls to visible drips during rainfall. Recognizing the signs early and documenting the extent of the damage is crucial for building a strong case for your housing disrepair claim.
  3. Communicating with Your Landlord or Housing Authority: Once you’ve identified the issue, it’s essential to inform your landlord or housing authority promptly. Clearly outline the problem, including details such as when the leak started and any damage it has caused to your belongings or the property’s structure.
  4. Documenting Evidence: Gathering evidence to support your claim is vital. Take photographs or videos of the leak and any resulting damage, such as water stains or mold growth. Keep records of all communications with your landlord or housing authority regarding the issue, including dates, times, and responses received.
  5. Seeking Professional Assessment: In some cases, it may be necessary to seek a professional assessment of the roof’s condition. A qualified roofer or building surveyor can provide an independent evaluation of the problem and its extent, which can strengthen your housing disrepair claim.
  6. Exploring Legal Options: If your landlord or housing authority fails to address the leaking roof despite your efforts to communicate and document the issue, you may need to consider legal action. Consulting with a solicitor who specializes in housing law can help you understand your legal rights and options for pursuing compensation or repairs.
  7. Making Your Claim: When making a housing disrepair claim for a leaking roof, it’s essential to follow the proper procedures and timelines outlined by law. Providing clear evidence of the disrepair and demonstrating that your landlord has failed to fulfill their obligations is key to a successful claim.
  8. Reaping the Benefits: By making a housing disrepair claim for a leaking roof, you not only hold your landlord accountable but also ensure that necessary repairs are carried out to improve the safety and quality of your living environment. Additionally, you may be entitled to compensation for any inconvenience or damage caused by the disrepair.

Conclusion: Don’t let a leaking roof dampen your spirits or compromise your living conditions. By asserting your rights as a tenant in England and Wales and making a housing disrepair claim, you can hold your landlord accountable and ensure that necessary repairs are carried out promptly. Take action today to protect your home and your well-being.

Important links

Housing Disrepair Advice: https://housingdisrepairadvice.org/contact

Housing Ombudsman: https://www.housing-ombudsman.org.uk/

Broken heating system in rented homes

Broken heating system in rented homes

Broken heating system in rented homes

Broken heating system in rented homes: Facing a broken heating system in your rented home during the chilly months can be distressing. Whether you’re a social housing tenant or a private renter in England and Wales, understanding your rights and knowing how to handle the situation is crucial. In this guide, we’ll discuss the steps you should take if your heating system fails, ensuring you stay warm and informed.

  1. Recognizing the Signs: Before diving into the solutions, it’s essential to recognize when your heating system is on the fritz. Look out for signs like strange noises, uneven heating, or complete failure to produce warmth. Being proactive can help prevent the issue from escalating.
  2. Communicate with Your Landlord or Housing Authority: Once you’ve identified a problem with your heating, promptly inform your landlord or housing authority. Communication is key in resolving maintenance issues swiftly. Clearly outline the problem and request a prompt resolution.
  3. Know Your Rights: As a tenant, you have rights concerning the habitability of your rented property, including heating provisions. In England and Wales, landlords are legally obligated to ensure that heating systems are in proper working condition, especially during colder seasons. Familiarize yourself with the relevant regulations to assert your rights confidently.
  4. Document Everything: Keep a record of all communication with your landlord or housing authority regarding the heating issue. Document dates, times, and the nature of discussions, including any promises or agreements made. This documentation can serve as evidence if further action is necessary.
  5. Explore Temporary Heating Solutions: While waiting for repairs, consider temporary heating solutions to stay warm. Portable heaters or electric blankets can provide temporary relief. However, ensure that any additional appliances comply with safety regulations and guidelines.
  6. Follow Up: If the issue persists despite your efforts to communicate and document, follow up with your landlord or housing authority. Politely remind them of their obligations under the law and emphasize the impact the lack of heating is having on your quality of life.
  7. Seek Legal Advice if Necessary: In rare cases where landlords or housing authorities fail to address heating issues adequately, seeking legal advice may be necessary. Tenant advocacy groups or legal aid services can provide guidance on your rights and potential courses of action.
  8. Consider Alternative Accommodation: If the heating problem remains unresolved for an extended period, explore the option of temporary alternative accommodation. In severe cases where inhabiting the property poses health risks due to lack of heating, you may be entitled to seek reimbursement for reasonable accommodation expenses.

Conclusion: Dealing with a broken heating system in your rented home can be stressful, but knowing your rights and taking proactive steps can help resolve the issue effectively. By communicating with your landlord or housing authority, documenting all interactions, and exploring temporary solutions, you can ensure that your living conditions remain safe and comfortable, even in the coldest of times. Stay informed, assert your rights, and don’t let the cold freeze you out of a warm home.

Important links

Housing Disrepair Advice: https://housingdisrepairadvice.org/contact

Housing Ombudsman: https://www.housing-ombudsman.org.uk/

How does a landlord fix damp?

How does a landlord fix damp?

How does a landlord fix damp?

How does a landlord fix damp? Left unchecked, invasive structural damp, leaks, condensation and mould seriously compromise rental housing conditions and tenant relations. But accurately pinpointing underlining moisture causes and deploying appropriate fixes challenges even seasoned landlords. What process should landlords follow to fully remedy hazardous damp?

  1. Commission Professional Damp Assessments Rather than ineffective guesswork, landlords should hire accredited damp proofing specialists to extensively survey affected properties using moisture meters, endoscope cameras in walls, and leak detection dye tests. Their technical reports identify specific defect causes for targeted fixing.
  2. Categorise Repair Types
    Guided by surveyor recommendations, categorise whether the damp requires:
  • Structural repairs like cracked membrane replacements
  • Plumbing fixes to leaking pipes/overflows
  • Insulation, ventilation/extraction additions to reduce condensation risks
  • Heating system adjustments to remove excess moisture
  1. Organise Specialist Contractors Depending on the scale of works needed, liaise qualified plumbers electricians, builders, engineers etc. to methodically correct identified faults enabling moisture ingress. This avoids botched amateur repairs by landlords that fail to fix root problems.
  2. Agree Reasonable Tenant Relocation If repairs require temporary house decanting, provide tenants reasonable equivalent alternative accommodation given suitable notice periods. This resolves occupancy legalities.
  3. Treat Affected Internal Areas Once addressing origins, employ dedicated damp remediation contractors to fix previous water damage, treat mould and prevent new outbreaks in line with industry guidelines. This properly restores property states.

Conclusion Albeit convoluted, landlords must break the cycle of quick superficial damp fixes eventually failing repeatedly. Meticulous moisture cause investigations alongside relocation sensitivity enables reliable long-term rental rehabilitation that satisfies all stakeholders.

If your landlord is refusing to deal with damp issues then you may qualify to make a housing conditions claim. This means you can have your issues dealt with and compensation in a matter of months. Contact our team today.

Housing Disrepair Advice: https://housingdisrepairadvice.org/contact

Housing Ombudsman: https://www.housing-ombudsman.org.uk/

Is it expensive to treat damp?

Is it expensive to treat damp?

Is it expensive to treat damp?

Is it expensive to treat damp? Discovering sections of plaster detaching from sodden walls or murky mould blooms ruining your furnishings forces distressed homeowners to confront the problem – how much will adequately fixing damp issues cost? Especially in older properties, is solving moisture issues an eye-wateringly expensive undertaking?

Moderate Repair Cost Estimates The qualified good news – the cost of professionally treating damp and mould outbreaks through typical combined building repairs and fungal elimination normally averages £2,500 to £5,000 for a standard house when using registered specialists. This covers:

  • An accredited damp & timber property survey with recommendations – £250+
  • Subfloor ventilation installation – £500+
  • Electrical or plumbing leak repairs – £200+
  • Installation of proper insulation like cavity wall fill to reduce condensation risks – £800+
  • Chemical washes, dry lining and mould-resistant paints to treat affected walls – £700+

Quotes rise for larger properties, extensive damage or complex structural remediation needs.

Cost Mitigation Options Numerous options potentially reduce expenses like tenants coordinating repair requests to distribute landlord costs or pursuing mutually beneficial insurance claims regarding third-party root causes. Compare multiple quotes emphasizing long warranties too.

Additionally, councils or charities may contribute discretionary financial and legal assistance for struggling tenants living in damaging conditions. This aims to avoid homelessness.

Weighing Expenditure Against Further Risks Ultimately the accumulated costs of allowing hazardous damp and accompanying mould to deteriorate unchecked rarely justify postponed repairs, from declining rent values and tenant disputes to major rebuilds. Early preventative treatment remains the most cost-effective and healthiest solution all occupants benefit from.

Your Council and Housing Association are legally responsible for treating damp issues. If you have complained and nothing has been done you may have cause to make a housing conditions claim. Find out if you qualify to by contacting our team of experts.

Housing Disrepair Advice: https://housingdisrepairadvice.org/contact

Housing Ombudsman: https://www.housing-ombudsman.org.uk/

What is the difference between damp and mould?

What is the difference between damp and mould?

What is the difference between damp and mould?

What is the difference between damp and mould? Many tenants use the terms “damp” and “mould” interchangeably when finding moist patches or fungus in properties. However, while linked, clinical experts describe damp and mould as distinct housing issues needing tailored solutions. Below we detail the key differences.

Defining Damp Essentially, damp refers to any unwanted moisture within structures arising from:

  • Rising ground moisture drawn through walls missing proper membranes.
  • Leaking roofs or broken pipes enabling water penetration.
  • Condensation droplets forming on cold surfaces without adequate warmth, ventilation and insulation.

Indications specifically involve musty odours, stained patches, peeling paint, eroding plaster and timber warping, even without mould. Addressing infiltration sources forms vital damp-proofing.

Explaining Mould By contrast, mould defines the many species of opportunistic fungal organisms that colonize damp areas. This plant-like kingdom thrives on cellulose-based materials in humid, stagnant indoor air environments.

While many moulds appear harmless, producing allergens and chaotic growth damaging buildings, certain genera even emit toxic gases carrying potential health risks with chronic exposure.

Mould Clean up and Control Crucially, while fixing leaks and ventilation issues aids prevention, effectively cleaning, killing and safely containing existing indoor mould growth requires specialized biocide treatments to avoid wider spreading. This ensures successful health hazard elimination.

In summary, “dampness” refers to the broader housing moisture issues, while “mould” describes the resulting biological fungus buildup itself. Their solutions interlink but focus on different areas – from leak repairs to spore neutralization. Tackling both fully protects homes.

As a tenant you have legal right to live in a home that is free of issues. If you are tired of living in substandard conditions, then feel free to book a call with our team and we will help you discuss what options and action is available to you.

Housing Disrepair Advice: https://housingdisrepairadvice.org/contact

Housing Ombudsman: https://www.housing-ombudsman.org.uk/

How do you check yourself for mould poisoning?

How do you check yourself for mould poisoning?

How do you check yourself for mould poisoning?

How do you check yourself for mould poisoning? Worried those persistent health complaints like fatigue, breathing trouble and skin irritation stem from your damp, mouldy home? Proactively checking yourself for toxic environmental exposure provides vital health insight. But what mould poisoning test methods and checks exist?

We detail key options below:

Assess Your Environment
Carefully examine all rooms in your home for visible mould growth and musty damp smells, especially in darker corners and behind furniture. Note down locations and severity as this establishes exposure sources. Have an accredited professional mould inspector survey and test if uncertain on scope.

Consider Your Symptoms Extensively track daily symptoms like wheezing, nosebleeds, memory fog, rashes etc. especially differences between times spent at home versus elsewhere. Make a timeline of when housing conditions worsened versus your declining health. Symptom journals help doctors diagnose later.

Do Respiratory Checks
Objectively measure lung function looking for signs of reduced capacity from inflammation like lowered peak flow rates. This involves breathing into portable devices multiple times daily to log changes. Sudden drops after time in your house adds evidence of airway irritation.

Order a HLA DR Lab Test This specialised blood test detects immune inflammation markers and biomarkers affiliated with toxic mould exposure. While not definitive alone due to other potential causes, abnormal HLA DR results suggest mould contributes to health complaints meriting removal from the environment.

Seek Medical Confirmation Finally, see both your general practitioner and consider specialist referrals to trained environmental health doctors. Provide symptom journals and test results alongside dates of reported housing disrepair. Their clinical confirmation of likely mold-induced illness builds your health and any legal case for relocation assistance.

Early proactive personal testing means occupants don’t suffer poor health silently. Flagging hazardous housing prevents serious future mold-related dysfunction or disability.

Important links

Housing Disrepair Advice: https://housingdisrepairadvice.org/contact

Housing Ombudsman: https://www.housing-ombudsman.org.uk/

How long does it take to get sick from mould exposure?

How long does it take to get sick from mould exposure?

How long does it take to get sick from mould exposure?

How long does it take to get sick from mould exposure? Inhaling airborne mould spores or mycotoxins released from damp fungal growth poses proven health risks. But how quickly after exposure do symptoms like coughs, breathing issues or rashes appear? Can serious illness manifest in days or do problems develop over months? We detail timescales.

Acute Symptoms – Minutes to Hours In rare cases of large spore infections from disturbances like flood demolitions, acute mold-related symptoms can arise rapidly. These include:

  • Wheezing and difficulty breathing from inflammation/allergic reactions
  • Stinging throat and eyes
  • Runny noses and sinus congestion
  • Headaches and dizziness
  • Fatigue from immune response

Such symptoms may emerge suddenly hours after a major exposure spike from containment breaches. Seek medical assistance promptly in severe responses.

Delayed Impacts – Days to Weeks
More commonly, it takes days to weeks after moving into a damp, mouldy property or such conditions developing before cumulative health complaints emerge. Repeated lower-level spore intake allows gradual respiratory, skin or general immune irritation. Effects also worsen over time without mitigation.

Chronic Long-Term Illnesses Finally, months or years living immersed in mould environments leads to serious chronic conditions like:

  • Respiratory dysfunction including asthma and lung scarring
  • Autoimmune disorders
  • Potential neurological conditions from mycotoxin buildup
  • Vision issues from prolonged toxicity and inflammation
  • Cancer risks

The key takeaway remains that the longer anyone inhabits mould-affected buildings, the higher their disease exposure. Act rapidly on damp issues for safety.

Do not wait any longer than you need to, to seek help and advice. Our team are on hand to talk you through what options are available to you and how a housing conditions claim could be made against your council or housing association. You could be issue free and compensated in a matter of months.

Housing Disrepair Advice: https://housingdisrepairadvice.org/contact

Housing Ombudsman: https://www.housing-ombudsman.org.uk/

Can my landlord blame me for mould?

Can my landlord blame me for mould?

Can my landlord blame me for mould?

Introduction:

Can my landlord blame me for mould? Finding dark fuzzy mould suddenly sprouting across your rental walls or ceiling can spark immediate tenant fears over blame. Landlords often hastily accuse residents of “lifestyle choices” like poor ventilation causing excessive moisture. But what rights protect tenants against unfair accusations when attempting to compel repairs?

Landlord vs Tenant Maintenance Duties Legally under the Landlord and Tenant Act 1985, landlords retain obligations to effectively treat and repair damp, leaks and mould issues stemming from structural failings like:

  • Lacking damp proof membranes allowing rising ground moisture
  • Roof leaks enabling penetrating dampness
  • Major plumbing defects
  • Broken guttering and external drainage

Where deficiencies relate to the building itself, landlords cannot lawfully blame tenants.

Meanwhile, tenants must take reasonable ventilation precautions, promptly report minor issues before mould outbreaks, and avoid intentionally introducing excessive steam without extraction like industrial growing operations!

Unfair Accusations and Retaliation Landlords frequently ignore legal obligations by immediately accusing residents of “lifestyle choices” causing humidity and mould. Sometimes they even attempt illegal retaliation like harassing residents seeking repairs or attempting unlawful early evictions.

However, advisers typically classify these behaviours as unlawful harassment or discrimination. Keep dated photo evidence of mould growth locations, formal repair requests, and health issues to help defend against false landlord accusations if necessary.

Seeking External Validation If disputes persist, independent council environmental health inspections can determine causes and liability. Landlords presented with official warnings and improvement notices often back down over unfounded tenant blaming. Alternatively, housing charities can advocate directly for affected tenants.

Ultimately the law prevents handing tenants full accountability for structural external housing defects realistically outside their control.

Do not think you are alone. We have helped thousands of tenants over ten years get their homes repaired and compensation.

Housing Disrepair Advice: https://housingdisrepairadvice.org/contact

Housing Ombudsman: https://www.housing-ombudsman.org.uk/

Can damp and mould be fixed?

Can damp and mould be fixed?

Can damp and mould be fixed?

Introduction:

Can damp and mould be fixed? Dampness and resulting black mould outbreaks frustrate countless tenants. The unpleasant musty smell and risk of fungus triggering health issues makes the problem seem insurmountable. However, while challenging to fully prevent long-term, understanding modern solutions to properly treat and control household damp can help affected residents regain safe, stable conditions.

Tackling Root Causes Mould fundamentally stems from excess moisture, so experts tackling infiltration sources provides the bottom line fix. Common culprits include:

  • Lack of insulation enabling condensation formation on cold surfaces
  • External ground moisture rising through walls due to missing damp proof courses
  • Leaking pipes, waster overflows or rain seepage from damage allowing water to penetrate internally
  • HVAC system faults increasing humidity
  • Bathroom/kitchen extractions failures

Correcting defects through installing insulation, sealing outside leaks, and upgrading ventilation systems provides the fundamental fix to then keep mould away long-term through proactive upkeep.

Mould Treatment and Prevention To manage existing mould fully, combine thorough cleaning using fungicidal chemical washes with follow-up redecoration to seal-in treatments under new low-permeability paint. This prevents fresh spore release and regrowth.

Ongoing prevention involves tenants wiping down moisture prone areas weekly and immediately reporting larger build-ups, while landlords respect repair duties to strengthen protections against excess dampness sources. Small daily tenant ventilation efforts combine with appropriate landlord housing quality maintenance to minimize risks.

Seeking Property Assessments If the root moisture sources prove complex, professional damp & timber surveys using moisture meters, endoscope cameras and leak detection dye tests help landlords understand necessary permanent works. Costly but occasionally essential last fixes involve installing interior waterproof membranes or even underpinning foundations.

Conclusion While challenging, addressing core dampness and mould reasons through condition surveys, repairs and spore release prevention provides lasting solutions. Persistence in boosted tenant communication alongside modern landlord housing standards delivers necessary change.

Important links

Housing Disrepair Advice: https://housingdisrepairadvice.org/contact

Housing Ombudsman: https://www.housing-ombudsman.org.uk/

Is it illegal to rent a property with damp?

Is it illegal to rent a property with damp?

Is it illegal to rent a property with damp?

Introduction:

Is it illegal to rent a property with damp? Many tenants uncomfortably accept minor dampness issues as an inevitable downside of ageing rental stock. However, at what point does a landlord letting out or continuing a tenancy in a severely moisture-affected property cross the line from unethical into outright illegal behaviour?

Defining Unfit Dwellings English and Welsh housing law deems rental homes “unfit for human habitation” if they contain Category 1 hazards under the Housing Health and Safety Rating System (HHSRS) that pose major threats to occupant health and safety.

Chronic structural dampness, mould growth, water damage and poor insulation fall under the excess cold hazard category. Where these make homes extremely hazardous to inhabit, councils must intervene.

Unlawful Behaviour Around Letting Damp Properties Specifically, landlords act unlawfully if they:

  • Knowingly let unfit dwellings without officially informing tenants of severe moisture defects
  • Do not carry out required repairs within suitable timeframes when reasonably notified of hazardous damp, leaking roofs etc impeding safe occupation
  • Fail to cover relocation costs if moisture requires emergency decanting during remedial works
  • Retaliate against tenants who assert their legal right not to reside in unlawful hazardous conditions

Consequences can include prohibition notices, fines up to £30,000, rent repayment orders and civil suits from affected tenants.

Seeking Local Authority Assistance If landlords will not rectify serious damp incidences rendering homes unsafe, tenants should contact council environmental health teams for urgent assistance. These officers can inspect, verify unfitness and force rapid improvements with legal powers.

Allowing tenants to reside in dangerous damp conditions violates housing legislation. Authorities now take an increasingly strict approach to such endangerment.

Do not allow your landlord to get away with any form of neglect. Our team are here seven days a week to offer free help and advice.

Housing Disrepair Advice: https://housingdisrepairadvice.org/contact

Housing Ombudsman: https://www.housing-ombudsman.org.uk/