Tag housing disrepair solicitors bradford

Housing disrepair case studies

Housing disrepair case studies

Housing disrepair case studies

Housing disrepair case studies: Living with a landlord who neglects repairs can feel like a constant battle. Dripping taps, broken boilers, and damp patches can turn your home into a health hazard and a source of stress. But fear not, fellow tenants! You’re not alone in this fight, and there have been victories. Here are some inspiring case studies showcasing how UK tenants tackled disrepair and emerged victorious:

Case Study 1: The Cold Shoulder and the Heating Fix

The Problem: Sarah lived in a flat with faulty central heating throughout the winter. Despite repeated requests to her landlord, the issue remained unresolved, leaving her shivering and resorting to space heaters.

The Fight: Sarah documented the lack of heating with photos and temperature readings. She contacted Citizens Advice [Citizens Advice] who helped her draft a formal complaint letter to the landlord, outlining the health risks and requesting repairs. When the landlord remained unresponsive, Sarah involved her local council’s environmental health department.

The Victory: The council conducted an inspection and deemed the property unfit for habitation during winter. The landlord was forced to make repairs and compensate Sarah for the inconvenience and additional heating costs she incurred.

Case Study 2: The Mouldy Maze and the Medical Move

The Problem: David started noticing damp and mould growth in his flat. He reported it to his landlord, but the repairs were temporary, and the mould kept reappearing. This led to respiratory problems for David.

The Fight: David kept a log of all communication with his landlord and documented the mould growth with photos. He also obtained a doctor’s note linking his respiratory issues to the damp conditions. With the help of a solicitor, David initiated legal action against his landlord.

The Victory: The court ruled in David’s favour, ordering the landlord to address the damp problem permanently and compensate David for his medical expenses and the inconvenience caused. He was also able to break his tenancy agreement and move to a healthier environment.

Case Study 3: The Leaky Nightmare and the Rent Reduction

The Problem: A constant leak from the roof left Emily’s flat with damaged ceilings and damp walls. The landlord initially ignored her requests, but eventually, a plumber deemed the roof structurally unsound.

The Fight: Emily documented the leak with photos and videos, capturing the damage and the ongoing issue. She contacted Citizens Advice, who advised her on her right to a rent reduction due to the severity of the disrepair. Emily then sent a formal letter to her landlord outlining the situation and requesting a rent reduction until the roof was repaired.

The Victory: Faced with the potential loss of rent and legal action, the landlord finally agreed to fix the roof. Emily received a rent reduction for the period she lived with the leak and the inconvenience it caused.

Remember, these are just a few examples. Every situation is different, but these cases show that tenants can win against disrepair!

Here are some resources to empower yourself:

Rent reduction for housing disrepair

Rent reduction for housing disrepair

Rent reduction for housing disrepair

Rent reduction for housing disrepair Imagine this: it’s pouring outside, but it’s also, well, pouring inside your flat. A leaky roof is turning your cosy haven into a damp disaster zone. Frustrating, right? But what if we told you there might be a way to ease the financial burden of this soggy situation? In the UK, tenants facing disrepair may be entitled to a rent reduction.

Hold On, Can I Really Reduce My Rent Because of a Leak?

While you can’t just slash your rent willy-nally, there are circumstances where a reduction might be possible. Here’s the deal:

  • The Disrepair Must Be Significant: A dripping tap is annoying, but it probably won’t qualify. We’re talking about serious issues like a leaky roof, a broken boiler, or faulty electrics that impact your health and safety or the overall habitability of the property.
  • The Landlord Must Be Neglecting Repairs: You informed your landlord about the issue, right? If they’ve been dragging their feet or ignoring your requests altogether, that strengthens your case.

How Much Rent Can I Reduce?

There’s no magic formula, but the reduction amount depends on:

  • Severity of the Disrepair: A major issue like a collapsing ceiling warrants a larger reduction than a minor leak.
  • Impact on Your Living Conditions: Are you living in a damp, cold flat? Did the disrepair damage your belongings? The greater the inconvenience, the stronger your case.
  • Landlord’s Response: Did they eventually fix the problem, or are you still living with the disrepair?

Important Note: Withholding rent can be a risky move. It’s best to consult with a solicitor or Citizens Advice [Citizens Advice] before taking this step. They can advise you on the best course of action and the appropriate amount of rent reduction to request.

Taking Action: Getting the Rent Reduction You Deserve

Here’s how to fight for a fair rent reduction:

  • Document Everything: Take photos and videos of the disrepair, and keep copies of all communication with your landlord regarding the issue.
  • Contact Your Local Council: Their environmental health department can inspect the property and potentially force repairs.
  • Seek Help from Citizens Advice: They offer free and impartial housing advice and can help you draft a formal complaint letter to your landlord outlining your request for a rent reduction.

Remember, a safe and well-maintained home is your right as a tenant. By understanding your options and documenting the disrepair, you can advocate for yourself and potentially reduce your rent while your landlord gets those repairs sorted!

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Housing disrepair act

Housing disrepair act

Housing disrepair act

Housing disrepair act Living with a leaky roof or a temperamental boiler is no one’s idea of a good time. But what happens when your landlord seems to be playing hide-and-seek with their repair responsibilities? Fear not, tenants in the UK have a legal shield – the Housing Disrepair Act (or rather, a combination of Acts!).

Understanding the Disrepair Defence: A Tenants’ Right

While there isn’t a single, all-encompassing “Housing Disrepair Act” in the UK, several pieces of legislation work together to protect tenants from living in disrepair. Here’s a breakdown of the key ones:

  • The Homes (Fitness for Human Habitation) Act 2018: This Act states that landlords must ensure their properties are safe and healthy to live in. This includes keeping the structure watertight, plumbing and electrics functioning properly, and providing heating and hot water.
  • The Defective Premises Act 1972: This Act makes landlords liable for injuries or damage to belongings caused by disrepair in the property.
  • The Landlord and Tenant Act 1985: This Act outlines a landlord’s responsibility to repair certain issues within the property.

What Does This Mean for You?

These Acts empower you as a tenant to:

  • Demand repairs: If your home suffers from disrepair that affects its safety or habitability, your landlord is legally obligated to fix it.
  • Withhold rent (in some cases): Under specific circumstances, you may be able to apply to court to pause your rent payments until repairs are completed. However, legal advice is crucial before taking this step.
  • Claim compensation: If the disrepair has caused you inconvenience, illness, or damage to your belongings, you might be entitled to compensation from your landlord.

Remember, the specific Act and your rights may vary depending on the type of tenancy agreement you have.

Know Your Rights, Know Your Repairs:

Here are some common repairs covered by these Acts:

  • Structural problems: Leaky roofs, damp patches, faulty windows or doors.
  • Plumbing nightmares: Leaky pipes, blocked drains, malfunctioning toilets or sinks.
  • Electrical hazards: Faulty wiring, tripping switches, temperamental sockets.
  • Heating and hot water woes: A broken boiler or chilly radiators.

Standing Up for Your Rights: Taking Action

If your landlord is neglecting repairs, here’s what you can do:

  • Document everything: Take photos and videos of the disrepair, and keep copies of all communication with your landlord.
  • Contact your local council’s environmental health department: They can inspect the property and enforce repairs if necessary.
  • Seek advice from Citizens Advice [Citizens Advice]: They offer free and impartial housing advice and can help you draft a formal complaint letter to your landlord.

Remember, a safe and well-maintained home is your right as a tenant in the UK. By understanding the Housing Disrepair Acts and your options, you can ensure your landlord keeps your rental property shipshape!

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Housing disrepair damages

Housing disrepair damages

Housing disrepair damages

Housing disrepair damages. Imagine this: you come home to a symphony of dripping – not a relaxing melody, but a leaky roof. Now, frustration sets in. This isn’t just an annoyance; it’s disrepair, and it could be impacting your health, your wallet, and your overall living situation. But what about the financial side of things? Can you claim compensation for the damages caused by disrepair in your UK rental?

Know Your Rights: What is Disrepair Damage?

Disrepair damage goes beyond the initial problem. It’s the additional toll this issue takes on your life. Here are some examples:

  • Health Problems: Mould from dampness can trigger allergies or asthma.
  • Damaged Belongings: A leaky pipe can ruin carpets or furniture.
  • Increased Utility Bills: A faulty boiler can lead to higher heating costs.
  • Inconvenience and Stress: Living with constant repairs or an uncomfortable environment can take a toll.

The Compensation Calculation Conundrum

There’s no magic “disrepair damage calculator” for tenants in the UK. The compensation you might be entitled to depends on several factors:

  • Severity of the Disrepair: A minor leak is different from a collapsing ceiling.
  • Impact on Your Life: Did the disrepair cause illness, damage belongings, or make the property unusable?
  • Landlord’s Response: Did they address the issue promptly or leave you hanging?
  • Length of Time: How long did you endure the disrepair?

Building Your Case: Documenting Disrepair Damage

While there isn’t a set formula, you can strengthen your claim by being prepared:

  • Gather Evidence: Take photos and videos of the disrepair, including timestamps.
  • Keep Records: Save emails, letters, and phone logs with your landlord regarding repairs.
  • Document the Impact: If you experience health problems or have damaged belongings, keep records (e.g., doctor’s notes, receipts).

Getting the Help You Deserve

The journey to claiming compensation can be confusing. Here are some resources to empower you:

  • Citizens Advice [Citizens Advice] offers free and impartial housing advice. They can guide you through the process and help draft a formal complaint letter to your landlord.
  • Shelter England [Shelter England] provides information on your rights as a tenant and potential solutions for disrepair issues.

Legal Action: A Last Resort

If your landlord is unresponsive or unwilling to offer fair compensation, legal action might be necessary. However, this should be a last resort. Seek professional legal advice before proceeding.

Remember, you deserve a safe and well-maintained home. By understanding disrepair damages and documenting the impact on your life, you can advocate for yourself and potentially recover compensation for the inconvenience and losses you’ve faced.

Additional Resources:

Housing disrepair compensation calculator

Housing disrepair compensation calculator

Housing disrepair compensation calculator.

Housing disrepair compensation calculator. Living with a dripping tap or a flickering light can be a nuisance, but what happens when disrepair in your rented property becomes a serious issue impacting your health and well-being? Fear not, tenants in the UK have rights, and you might be entitled to compensation for the inconvenience caused by your landlord’s neglect.

Broken Promises, Broken Homes: Understanding Disrepair

Disrepair goes beyond minor annoyances. It encompasses any issue that makes your rented property unsafe or unfit to live in. This can include:

  • Structural problems: Leaky roofs, damp patches, faulty windows or doors.
  • Plumbing nightmares: Leaky pipes, blocked drains, malfunctioning toilets or sinks.
  • Electrical hazards: Faulty wiring, tripping switches, temperamental sockets.
  • Heating and hot water woes: A broken boiler or chilly radiators leaving you shivering.

While there isn’t a one-size-fits-all compensation calculator for housing disrepair, several factors influence the amount you might be entitled to:

  • Severity of the disrepair: A leaky faucet is different from a collapsing ceiling.
  • Duration of the disrepair: How long have you been living with the issue?
  • Impact on your living conditions: Has the disrepair caused any health problems or damage to your belongings?
  • Landlord’s response: Did they respond promptly to your repair requests?

The Power of Documentation: Building Your Case

While compensation calculators might not be readily available, you can strengthen your claim by keeping detailed records. Here’s how:

  • Document the disrepair: Take photos and videos of the issues, including timestamps.
  • Keep copies of communication: Save emails, letters, and phone logs with your landlord regarding the repairs.
  • Record any health issues: Maintain documentation of any health problems that might be linked to the disrepair.

Seeking Support: Getting the Compensation You Deserve

While navigating disrepair and compensation claims can be overwhelming, there are resources available:

  • Citizens Advice [Citizens Advice] offers free and impartial housing advice. They can guide you through the process and help draft a formal complaint letter to your landlord.
  • Shelter England [Shelter England] provides information on your rights as a tenant and potential solutions for disrepair issues.

Legal Action as a Last Resort

If your landlord refuses to repair the disrepair or offer reasonable compensation, you may need to consider legal action. This should be a last resort, and it’s best to seek professional legal advice before proceeding.

Remember, a safe and well-maintained home is your right as a tenant in the UK. By understanding your options and gathering evidence, you can advocate for yourself and potentially claim compensation for the inconvenience caused by disrepair.

Additional Resources:

Getting repairs done in a rented property

Getting repairs done in a rented property

Getting repairs done in a rented property

Getting repairs done in a rented property. Let’s face it, unexpected breakdowns in your rented flat are a pain. A dripping tap can turn into a symphony of annoyance, and a wonky boiler on a chilly night is enough to make anyone grumpy. But before you resort to DIY heroics (unless you’re a qualified plumber!), here’s a handy guide for UK tenants on getting those repairs sorted swiftly and smoothly.

Know Your Rights (Like a Boss) Getting repairs done in a rented property

First things first, knowledge is power! In the UK, landlords are legally responsible for ensuring their properties meet specific health and safety standards. This translates to keeping the roof over your head watertight (literally!), the plumbing in tip-top condition, and the electrics safe.

Here’s a quick rundown of repairs that typically fall under your landlord’s responsibility:

  • Structural woes: Leaky roofs, damp patches, dodgy windows or doors.
  • Plumbing problems: Leaky pipes, blocked drains, malfunctioning toilets or sinks.
  • Electrical nightmares: Faulty wiring, tripping switches, temperamental sockets.
  • Heating and hot water woes: A broken boiler or chilly radiators leaving you feeling like a popsicle.

Unsure if a specific repair falls under your landlord’s domain? Check your tenancy agreement – it should outline each party’s responsibilities.

Communication is Key (and Documented!)

The next step is to inform your landlord about the gremlins causing havoc in your rented haven. Here’s where clear communication shines. Don’t rely on a casual chat – put it in writing! Send an email or a recorded delivery letter detailing the issue, including the date you noticed it and any potential health and safety risks.

Bonus Tip: Here’s a template to get you started:

“Dear [Landlord’s Name],

I am writing to inform you about a problem with [describe the issue] in the property located at [your address]. I first noticed this issue on [date].

[ Briefly explain the impact of the issue, e.g., water damage, lack of heating].

I kindly request that you arrange for the repairs to be completed as soon as possible.

Thank you for your time and attention to this matter.

Sincerely, [Your Name]”

Remember to keep copies of all communication with your landlord – emails, letters, and even phone call logs if possible. This creates a paper trail that will be crucial if things need to be escalated further.

Still No Sign of a Fix? Here’s What You Can Do:

If your messages are met with radio silence or your landlord seems to be playing hide-and-seek with their repair responsibilities, don’t fret! Here are some options to explore:

  • Contact your local council’s environmental health department. They can assess the property and enforce repairs if necessary.
  • Citizens Advice [Citizens Advice] is your knight in shining armour for free and impartial housing advice. They can guide you through your options and help you draft a formal complaint letter to your landlord.
  • Consider legal action. In extreme cases, you may need to take legal action to force your landlord to make the repairs. However, this should be a last resort, so seek professional advice beforehand.

Living Rent-Free (with a Big But): Withholding Rent

While the idea of withholding rent until repairs are completed might be tempting, there are legal restrictions. Generally, you can’t simply stop paying rent. However, in specific situations, you may be able to apply to a court to place your rent in a holding scheme until the repairs are done. This is a complex legal procedure, so consulting a solicitor is highly recommended.

Remember, you deserve a safe and well-maintained home. By following these steps and knowing your rights, you can ensure your landlord keeps your rented property shipshape!

For More Info:

Landlord refusing repairs

Landlord refusing repairs

Landlord refusing repairs

As a tenant in the UK, you deserve a safe and habitable home. But what happens when your landlord refuses to fix a leaky roof, a broken boiler, or a faulty appliance? It can be frustrating and leave you feeling stuck. Don’t worry, because tenants have rights! This blog will empower you with the knowledge to navigate a situation where your landlord is refusing repairs.

Understanding Your Landlord’s Responsibilities

Landlords in the UK are legally obligated to ensure their rental properties meet specific health and safety standards. This includes keeping the structure in good repair, maintaining plumbing and electrical systems, and providing hot water and heating.

Here are some key repairs your landlord is generally responsible for:

  • Structural issues: Leaking roofs, damp, damaged windows and doors.
  • Plumbing problems: Leaky pipes, blocked drains, faulty toilets and sinks.
  • Electrical faults: Faulty wiring, tripping switches, broken sockets.
  • Heating and hot water: Broken boilers, malfunctioning radiators.

If you’re unsure whether a repair falls under your landlord’s responsibility, it’s always best to check your tenancy agreement.

Communicate Clearly and Document Everything

The first step is to communicate the issue to your landlord clearly. It’s best to do this in writing, via email or a recorded delivery letter. Be specific about the problem, including the date you noticed it and any potential health or safety risks.

Here’s a template to get you started:

“Dear [Landlord’s name],

I am writing to inform you about a problem with [describe the issue] in the property located at [your address]. I first noticed this issue on [date].

[ Briefly explain the impact of the issue, e.g., water damage, lack of heating].

I kindly request that you arrange for the repairs to be completed as soon as possible.

Thank you for your time and attention to this matter.

Sincerely, [Your name]”

Keep a record of all communication with your landlord, including emails, letters, and any phone call logs. This will be crucial if the situation needs to be escalated further.

What if Your Landlord Still Refuses?

If your landlord remains unresponsive or refuses to carry out the repairs, don’t despair. Here are some next steps:

  • Contact your local council’s environmental health department. They can inspect the property and enforce repairs if necessary.
  • Citizens Advice [Citizens Advice] is a fantastic resource for free and impartial housing advice. They can guide you through your options and help you draft a formal complaint letter to your landlord.
  • Consider legal action. In extreme cases, you may need to take legal action to force your landlord to make the repairs. However, this should be a last resort, so seek professional advice beforehand.

Living Rent-Free (with Restrictions) : Withholding Rent

While it may be tempting, you generally cannot withhold rent simply because repairs haven’t been done. However, under certain circumstances, you may be able to apply to a court to place your rent in a holding scheme until the repairs are completed. This is a complex legal procedure, so consulting a solicitor is highly recommended.

Remember, you have the right to live in a safe and well-maintained home. Don’t be afraid to assert your rights and get the repairs you deserve!

Additional Resources:

Health hazards in rented property

Health hazards in rented property

Health hazards in rented property

Health hazards in rented property: Your rented property should be a haven – a place of comfort, safety, and good health. But what happens when your living space becomes a breeding ground for health hazards? From damp and mould to faulty electrics and asbestos, these hidden threats can pose serious risks to your well-being.

The good news is, as a tenant in the UK, you have the right to live in a safe and healthy home. This blog post will empower you to identify potential health hazards in your rented property and guide you on the steps to take for a healthier living environment.

Spot the Sneaky Culprits: Common Health Hazards in Rented Properties

Let’s delve into some of the most frequent health hazards lurking in rented properties:

  • Damp and Mould: This nasty duo thrives in damp environments, triggering respiratory problems, allergies, and even asthma attacks. Look for signs like black spots on walls, a musty odour, and peeling wallpaper.
  • Faulty Electrical Systems: Exposed wires, flickering lights, and overloaded sockets pose a serious fire risk and can cause electrical shocks.
  • Asbestos: This hazardous material was commonly used in older buildings and can cause lung cancer if disturbed. Be wary of textured coatings, lagging around pipes, and floor tiles that could potentially contain asbestos.
  • Excess Cold or Heat: Living in a poorly insulated property with inadequate heating or ventilation can lead to respiratory problems and even hypothermia in extreme cases.
  • Carbon Monoxide (CO) Poisoning: This odourless, colourless gas can be deadly if undetected. Faulty gas appliances or blocked flues are common culprits.

Taking Action: What to Do if You Find a Health Hazard

If you suspect a health hazard in your rented property, don’t ignore it! Here’s how to address the situation effectively:

  • Document, Document, Document: Take clear photos and videos of the hazard, including close-ups and wider shots showing the affected area. Note down the date you discovered it.
  • Inform Your Landlord Promptly: The sooner you report the issue, the sooner it can be addressed. Send a formal email or letter detailing the hazard, its location, and any potential health risks it poses.
  • Request a Repair or Inspection: Ask your landlord to arrange for a qualified professional to assess the problem and carry out the necessary repairs.

Empowering Yourself: Resources and Your Rights

Here are some resources and information to keep in mind:

Urgent repairs in rented property

Urgent repairs in rented property

Urgent repairs in rented property

Urgent repairs in rented property: Imagine this: it’s a chilly autumn evening, the wind howls outside, and you snuggle up for a cosy night in. But wait, a draft cuts through the window like a knife, reminding you of that nagging broken pane you reported weeks ago. Now, the once-manageable issue feels urgent. Brrr!

As a tenant in the UK, you have the right to live in a safe and healthy home. This includes having urgent repairs addressed promptly, especially when they impact essential amenities or pose a potential safety risk. But what qualifies as an urgent repair, and how do you ensure your landlord takes action quickly? Here’s your ultimate guide to navigating urgent repairs in your rented property.

What’s Considered Urgent?

Not all repairs are created equal. Here are some situations that typically fall under the “urgent repair” category:

  • Loss of essential services: This includes a broken boiler during winter, a faulty electrical system posing a fire risk, or a major leak causing water damage.
  • Health and safety hazards: Think exposed wires, a broken staircase railing, or a dangerous gas leak. These require immediate attention to prevent potential injuries or illness.
  • Security issues: A broken lock on your front door or a faulty window latch can leave your home vulnerable. Urgent repairs are needed to ensure your safety and security.

Communication is Key: Reporting the Urgent Repair

The quicker you inform your landlord, the faster the issue gets addressed. Here’s how to report an urgent repair effectively:

  • Pick up the phone: A phone call is the best first step. Explain the problem clearly, highlighting the urgency and potential consequences if left unaddressed.
  • Follow up with a written record: Send a formal email or letter detailing the issue, including the date, location, and a brief description of the urgency.

Tips for a Speedy Response

  • Be clear and concise: Focus on the facts of the situation and avoid emotional language.
  • Highlight the urgency: Emphasize the potential health and safety risks or the inconvenience caused by the lack of essential services.
  • Offer reasonable solutions: If possible, suggest a timeframe for repairs or propose alternative arrangements while the issue is being resolved.

Keeping the Pressure On (Respectfully, of course!)

If your landlord doesn’t respond promptly or seems hesitant to act, it’s okay to follow up. Here’s what you can do:

  • Maintain a record of communication: Keep copies of emails, letters, and notes from phone calls. This documentation will be crucial if further action becomes necessary.
  • Consider contacting your local council: The environmental health department can assess the property and potentially enforce repairs on your landlord if they pose a serious health or safety risk.

Important links

Housing Disrepair Advice: https://housingdisrepairadvice.org/contact

Housing Ombudsman: https://www.housing-ombudsman.org.uk/

Housing disrepair complaints procedure

Housing disrepair complaints procedure

Housing disrepair complaints procedure

Housing disrepair complaints procedure: Living in a rented property in the UK comes with a lot of perks – flexibility, location options, and sometimes, even a cute garden! But what happens when your haven starts feeling more like a hassle due to disrepair issues? A leaky roof, a broken boiler, or faulty electrics can quickly turn your dream home into a nightmare.

The good news is, as a tenant, you have rights! Here’s a breakdown of the disrepair complaints procedure in the UK, empowering you to take control and get those repairs sorted efficiently.

Step 1: Identifying Disrepair

Disrepair goes beyond just chipped paint or a squeaky floorboard. It refers to any issue that affects the property’s safety, health, or overall habitability. Here are some common examples:

  • Leaking roofs or windows
  • Faulty heating or hot water systems
  • Damp, mould, or condensation problems
  • Broken electrical fittings
  • Plumbing issues

Step 2: Check Your Tenancy Agreement

Before diving in, take a moment to familiarize yourself with your tenancy agreement. This document outlines the responsibilities of both you and your landlord regarding repairs and maintenance. It might specify certain communication channels or timelines for reporting issues.

Step 3: Document Everything!

Evidence is key! Take clear photos and even short videos of the disrepair. Include close-ups of the problem area and wider shots showing the overall context. If possible, note down the date you first noticed the issue.

Step 4: Report the Disrepair to Your Landlord

Now, it’s time to inform your landlord. Here are some communication methods:

  • Written communication: A formal email or letter detailing the issue, including the date, location, and any potential causes you suspect, creates a clear record.
  • Phone call: Follow up your written communication with a phone call to ensure your message is received. Keep a note of the date and time of the call, along with any key points discussed.

Step 5: Be Clear and Polite, But Firm

While maintaining a respectful tone, be clear about the disrepair and the urgency of the repairs needed. State your expectation for a timely response and outline the impact the disrepair is having on your ability to live comfortably and safely in the property.

Step 6: Keeping Track of Progress

It’s crucial to maintain a record of all communication with your landlord regarding the disrepair. This includes copies of emails, letters, and notes from phone calls.

Step 7: Knowing Your Rights

The Homes (Fitness for Human Habitation) Act 2018 gives you the right to live in a property free from serious hazards. Familiarizing yourself with this act will empower you to understand your rights and responsibilities as a tenant.

Important links

Housing Disrepair Advice: https://housingdisrepairadvice.org/contact

Housing Ombudsman: https://www.housing-ombudsman.org.uk/